Satires, with the Satires of Persius

by Juvenal

Publisher: Dent in London

Written in English
Published: Pages: 256 Downloads: 69
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Edition Notes

Previous ed.: 1954.

Statementtranslated by William Gifford, revised and annotated by John Warrington.
SeriesEveryman"s library
ContributionsPersius Flaccus, Aulus., Gifford, William., Warrington, John., Stoneman, Richard, 1951-
The Physical Object
Pagination(256)p. ;
Number of Pages256
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21455184M
ISBN 100460871714

Genre/Form: Translations Translations into English: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Persius. Satires of A. Persius Flaccus. Oxford: Clarendon Press, COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.   This dissertation treats Persius’ book of satires as a physical object, as a text to be read aloud, as a literary artefact that has a fundamental total structure, and as a text that is interested in its genre and in how satire can position itself against tired philosophical and literary traditions and tropes. It seeks to diversify the intellectual contexts in which the satirist may be.   Persius takes advantage of the birthday of his friend and fellow-pupil Plotius Macrinus to discourse on the folly of the prayers usually offered to the Gods (1–7). Men pray openly for worthy objects; they pray secretly for money, for inheritances, for the death of all who stand in their way, besieging Jupiter with petitions at which any ordinary citizen would stand aghast (8–30).

Juvenal’s most popular book is The Sixteen Satires. Juvenal has books on Goodreads with ratings. Juvenal’s most popular book is The Sixteen Satires. Selections from the Satires of Juvenal to Which Is Added the Fifth Satire of Persius by. Juvenal (Creator) it was amazing avg rating — 1 rating — 3 editions. Book V: Satires 13–16 (although Satire 16 is incomplete) The individual Satires (excluding Satire 16) range in length from (Satire 12) to c. (Satire 6) lines. The poems are not entitled individually, but translators often have added titles for the convenience of readers. Satire was a genre of poetry invented and developed by the Romans. When it came into Juvenal’s hands, he stamped his mark upon it: indignation. His angry voice had an overwhelming influence upon later European satirists and persists in modern forms of satire. In this new commentary, Susanna Morton Braund situates Juvenal within the genre of satire and illuminates his appropriation of the. The Satires of Persius (AD 34 62) are highly idiosyncratic, containing a courageous attack on the poetry and morals of his wealthy contemporaries even the ruling emperor, Nero. (source: Nielsen Book Data).

  Footnotes [] ↑ An epic poem. ↑ Names of tragedies. ↑ One of the judges in Hades. ↑ Jason. ↑ A Centaur, alluding to the battle between the Centaurs and the Lapithae. ↑ A rich patron who lends his house for recitations. ↑ Referring to the retirement of Sulla from public life in B.C. Such themes would be prescribed to schoolboys as rhetorical exercises, of the kind.

Satires, with the Satires of Persius by Juvenal Download PDF EPUB FB2

Satires with the Satires of Persius (Everyman's Library) Paperback – Octo by Juvenal (Author) › Visit Amazon's Juvenal Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search results for this author. Are you an author. Cited by: 1. Juvenal's Satires - With the Satires of Persius Paperback – January 1, by Juvenal (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Hardcover $Author: Juvenal. The Satires of Persius are highly idiosyncratic, containing a courageous attack on the poetry and morals of his wealthy contemporaries—even the ruling emperor, Nero.

The Satires of Horace, written in the troubled decade ending with the establishment of Augustus’s regime, provide an amusing treatment of men’s perennial enslavement to.

My favorite is Satire 2, which takes a mighty swing at religious hypocrites, while simultaneously hinting that the Satirist is himself sermonizing on his high horse.

It’s a shame that Persius died at such a young age, as we get the sense that these satires are really only a hint at his lar stars/5. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. The satires of Persius Item Preview remove-circle the Satires belonged to a small class of works which remained in constant circulation.

They were read in the schools, were commented upon by scholars, and were. The Satires of Horace ( BC), written in the troubled decade ending with the establishment of Augustus' regime, provide an amusing treatment of men's perennial enslavement to money, power, glory and sex.

Epistles I, addressed to the poet's friends, deals with the problem of achieving contentment amid the complexities of urban life, while Epistles II and the Ars Poetica discuss Latin poetry 4/5(2). Try the new Google Books.

Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books eBook - FREE. Get this book in print The Satires of A. Persius Flaccus: With a Translation and Commentary Persius, John Conington Full view - The Satires of A. Persius Flaccus, Issue 2.

The Satires of A. Persius Flaccus: With a Translation and Commentary by Persius, John Conington, Henry Nettleship. Publication date Publisher Clarendon Press Collection europeanlibraries Digitizing sponsor Google Book from the collections of Oxford University Language English.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Oxford University. Inspiring poets from Ben Jonson and Alexander Pope to W. Auden and Robert Frost, the writings of Horace and Persius have had a powerful influence on later Western literature.

The "Satires" of Persius are highly idiosyncratic, containing a courageous attack on the poetry and morals of his wealthy contemporariesaeven the ruling emperor, Nero.4/5(2). The book, edited by his friends Cornutus and Caesius Bassus, was an immediate success.

The six satires, amounting to lines, are in hexameters; but what appears as a prologue, in which Persius (an extremely wealthy man) ironically asserts that he writes to. Persius's satires tend to be more serious in subject matter and tone, criticising Roman culture, people's attitudes towards Topics range from lust and humourous fictional stories to technical critique of other satirists, sketching out theories of satire and (an often repeated theme) criticism of stoic philosophy/5.

Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Menu About About Project Gutenberg; Collection Development The Satires of A. Persius Flaccus Note: The text of this edition of Persius is, in the main, that of Jahn's last recension ()--Pref.

Language: Latin. The Satires of A. Persius has been added to your Cart Add to Cart. Buy Now See all 27 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Kindle "Please retry" $ — — Hardcover "Please retry" Format: Hardcover.

Excerpt from The Satires of Persius Translated: With Notes While, therefore, I fully admit the charge of obscurity, which has been brought against Persius, I cannot allow to it that weight, which it would have in most other cases.

Indeed, we may as well complain of the rust on an ancient coin, as of the obscurity of an ancient : Persius Persius. Persius Note on Satire 1. Satire 1 is a programmatic poem placed at the start of the book, following the precedent set by Lucilius and Horace in Satiresand later followed by Juvenal in Satire 1: see Courtney, Commentary on Juvenal () 82–3 and Braund, Juvenal Satires Book I () – Persius’ attitude towards literary activity in the Prologue is confirmed at the opening of.

3 The MSS. read Romae est or Romaest for Romae, and ae for a or ah. 4 The use of the Infinitive as a Noun is a special characteristic of Persius. So scire tuum (1. 27), ridere meum (1. ), pappare minutum (iii.

17), etc. 7 Professor Housman adopts Madvig's conjecture of articulis for auriculis, and translates ‘What. catering at your age for others' ears with cates which you. THE SATIRES OF PERSIUS Translated by W.

Merwin Introduction & Notes by W. Anderson by Persius; W. Merwin (Trans.) & William S. Anderson and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   The Satires of A. Persius Flaccus by Persius (Author) › Visit Amazon's Persius Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central. Persius (Author) ISBN ISBN Only my own Latin prevents my fifth star. After years with Juvenal, now Persius, my translation of his Prolog included in my new long poem, Parodies Lost: "Not along the lonely beaches, nor From scenery and mountain views, do I Remember brooding to become a writer.

The beaches and the lonely looks, I leave To pictures on the backs of books." Perseus asks, in Satire I, Who'll read such stuff as /5. Persius, in full Aulus Persius Flaccus (/ ˈ p ɜːr ʃ i ə s, ˈ p ɜːr ʃ ə s /; 4 Decem in Volterra – 24 November 62), was a Roman poet and satirist of Etruscan origin.

In his works, poems and satires, he shows a Stoic wisdom and a strong criticism for what he considered to be the stylistic abuses of his poetic contemporaries.

His works, which became very popular in the Middle. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Satires of Persius: Translated by Charlton Byam Wollaston, Esq., to Which Is Added, a Translation of the Epodes of Horace, by the Same Author (Classic Reprint) by Persius Persius (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. Genre/Form: Poetry Translations Translations into English: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Juvenal. Juvenal's satires, with the satires of Persius. ‎The Satires of Horace ( BC), written in the troubled decade ending with the establishment of Augustus' regime, provide an amusing treatment of men's perennial enslavement to money, power, glory and sex.

Epistles I, addressed to the poet's friends, deals with the problem of achieving contentment. item 7 The Satires of Horace and Persius (Penguin Classics) by Persius Paperback Book 7 - The Satires of Horace and Persius (Penguin Classics) by Persius Paperback Book.

$ Free shipping. See all 15 - All listings for this product. No ratings or reviews yet. Be the first to write a review. The Satires of Juvenal, Persius, Sulpicia, and Lucilius Literally translated into English prose, with notes, chronological tables, arguments, &c.

Language: English: LoC Class: PA: Language and Literatures: Classical Languages and Literature: Subject: Verse satire, Latin -- Translations into English Subject: Juvenal -- Translations into English. Satire I: A Justification; SatI Unbearable Stuff. SatI Why Choose Satire.

SatI It’s a Litany of Crime; SatI And All About Money; SatI The Reward of Greed; SatI The Dangers of Satire; Satire I: A Justification SatI Unbearable Stuff. Must I. Aulus Persius Flaccus (A.D.

) wrote in racy conversational Latin six satires countering contemporary vice with Stoic morality; he died young. This is not easy poetry, with its sudden shifts of tone, switches of speaker and situation, vivid evocation of the everyday roman background, and confident handling of philosophical positions.

Introduction by William S. Anderson. Published by Anvil Press Poetry, London, First UK edition. Softcover, white glossy wraps. Near Fine.

The Satires of Persius belong to a rich tradition in Roman literature. According to an ancient biography attached to the manuscripts of the Satires, Persius was born into an affluent family. The Satires of Persius are highly idiosyncratic, containing a courageous attack on the poetry and morals of his wealthy contemporaries—even the ruling emperor, Nero.

The Satires of Horace, written in the troubled decade ending with the establishment of Augustus’s regime, provide an amusing treatment of men’s perennial enslavement to money. The Satires (Latin: Satirae or Sermones) is a collection of satirical poems written by the Roman poet, ed in dactylic hexameters, the Satires explore the secrets of human happiness and literary perfection.

Published probably in 35 BC and at the latest, by 33 BC, the first book of Satires represents Horace's first published work. It established him as one of the great poetic.Braund's translation also includes the six satires of Persius, a Stoic who used satire to advance his philosophic position.

But you may also want to check out what Dr. Johnson did with his " London " poem and what he did with Juvenal 10 in " The Vanity of Human Wishes " or even check out Dryden's translations of "Juvenal".Get this from a library!

The satires of Persius. [Persius.; W S Merwin; William S Anderson] -- In the ancient world, the Satires belonged to a small class of works which remained in constant circulation. They were read in the schools, were commented upon by scholars, and were forever the.